On this day in 1996, a highly successful American hip hop artist, Tupac Amaru Shakur, was shot and fatally wounded in a drive-by shooting in Las Vegas, Nevada.

On this day in 1996, a highly successful American hip hop artist, Tupac Amaru Shakur, was shot and fatally wounded in a drive-by shooting in Las VegasNevada.

The shooting occurred at 11:15 p.m. Pacific time when the car carrying Shakur and the owner of his label, the Deathrow Records, Marion Suge Knights, was stopped at a red light at East Flamingo Road and Koval Lane.

Shakur was struck by four .40 caliber rounds fired from a Glock: two in the chest, one in the arm, and one in the thigh.

He died from his injuries six days later at the University Medical Center of Southern Nevada.

Tupac Amaru Shakur was 25 years old.

One year after the shooting, Sgt. Kevin Manning, who headed the investigation, told Las Vegas Sun investigative reporter Cathy Scott that Shakur’s murder “may never be solved”.

The case slowed early in the investigation, he said, as few new clues came in and witnesses clammed up.

He stated the investigation was at a standstill.

E.D.I. Mean, a collaborator of Shakur’s and a member of Outlawz, said he was positive law enforcement knew “what happened.

Years later, Duane “Kefee D” Davis had confessed to a former Police investigator, Chuck Philips, that his Nephew, Orlando Anderson who was a member of a Compton gang known as the South-side  Crips was responsible for the shooting.

In 2002, the Los Angeles Times published a two-part story by Chuck Philips, titled “Who Killed Tupac Shakur?” based on a year-long investigation.

Philips reported that “the shooting was carried to avenge the beating of Anderson by Shakur a few hours earlier.

The 22-year-old Orlando Anderson, popularly known as “Baby Lane” himself was fatally shot and killed in an unrelated gang violence in may of 1998 and could not tried.

Las Vegas police had considered Anderson a suspect at the beginning of investigations into Tupac’s murder in September of 1996 and interviewed him only once, briefly.

Philips’s article also implicated the owner of Bad Boy Records Sean Puffy Combs and a string of East Coast rappers, including Christopher Wallace A.K.A The Notorious B.I.G., Tupac’s rival at the time, and several New York criminals.

Less than seven months later, B.I.G was also killed in a drive-by shooting.

Both murders have never been solved.